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Full text of "World Wool Situation"

U.S. DEPOSITORY 



UNITED STATES EEPARTTET'T OF AGRICULTURE 

Bureau of <igricultural Economics 

Washington 



W00L-2.3 



TRADE .IITD COIISU.'IPTIOIT 



WORLD '.700L SITUATION 



PRICES 



February 27,19^0 



PRODUCT I PIT 



»I)or:.ostic -.7ool prices made further declines during January following 
the weakening in foreign markets but have remained steady during February 
except fnr .vools grading 46s and lover .vhich have continued to decline. 
Prices in Bradford and Australia imported toward the close of the London 
Wool Sales on February 6, following the decision to extend the Australian 
selling season into August. Recent cables indicate improvement in nearly 
all primary mariets. The Row Zealand sales have been postponed o.ving to 
the refusal of buyers to attend unless at least 20,000 bales vore to be 
offered. 

Prices of domestic vools declined at Boston from 1 to 2 cents a 
pound or a grease basis for 64s and finer .vools and from 4 to 7 cents a 
pound on vocls grading 60s and lover. The greatest decline .7ns on 1/4 
blood clothing vool ".vhich vas 7 cents lo.ver in the week ended February 15 
than on January 4. Fine -vools decline'd from 2 to 5 cents a pound on a 
scoured basis, half-bloods (58 -60s) .vere 5 to 7-ff- cents lover, and vools 
grading 56s and lover declined from 7-J- to 15 cents with the greatest 
decline on 48-50s clothing vools. 

New Zealand /ools declined 7 to 14 cents a pound and Australian 
vools were mostly 5 to 10 cents lover at Boston on February 15, on a 
scoured basis. South American vools at 3oston vere 4 to 7 cents lover 
on a grease basis. 



700L-23 - 2 - ' 

Production of wool in ^he United States during 1929, including 
pulled' f/ool, was 8 million pounds greater than last year. Most of this 
increase was in the States of Texas, Montana and California. Receipts 
of wool at Boston during January //.-ire about 3 million pcunds greater than 
last year but slightly • less than during January 1928. Imports of comb- 
ing and clothing wools into the United States during 1929 were over 11 
million pounds greater than last year although the imports for the month 
of December were 2 million pounds., less than last year. 

Domestic consumption- declined considerably amounting to only 38 
million pcunds, on a grease- basi s, in December compared with 47 million 
pounds in ITovember and 59 million pounds in October. 

British and Continental .vocl markets were quiet during January with 
buyers hesitant about placing orders in the face of the continued decline 
in price of -raw materials. Recently there has been more optimism and Brad- 
ford importers are buying slightly larger quantities. Hew orders indicate 
expected improvement in fine worsteds, and heavy .voolens. 

Stoclcs of tops . in commission combing establishments in Europe on 
February 1 amounted to. 53 million pounds or about 8 million pounds more 
than on February 1, 1929 and about 2 million pounds more than on Januarj 
1930. Stocks of tops- in France are over 6 million pounds heavier than 
last year. 

Wool production in 19 countries which usually proi ic ver ."0 
per cent of the world's .vool clip, exclusive of Russia and China, is es- 
timated to be about 2,687 million. pounds or about 9 millioi | 
than the large clip of last year. 



y 



- 3 - 

WOOL- 2 3 Prices? Donor; tic* 

The volume -of wool sold daring January was very moderate and was 

restricted to immediate requirements, according to R. L. Burrus of the 
Boston Wool Office of the Bureau -of ii^ri cultural Economics. A fairly 
heavy volume of trading during the latter part of December apparently 
was in anticipation of January requirements and the trading during the 
latter month was quite distinctly of a piecing oat character. January 
is seasonally a dull month because of the approach of openings of ne'.7 
lines of goods. Conditions this year have not been favorable to the policy 
of buying wool in anticipation of future needs. Wool values abroad were 
steadily declining and this situation was reflected in a continuous down- 
ward readjustment of quotations on domestic wools. Unsettled business 
conditions was a further incentive to the conservative policy of buying 
raw materials. 

Toward the close of January, foreign wool, markets showed a steadier 
trend. This improvement, however, had little effect upon the purchase of 
domestic wools. It did tend to create confidence in the current level of 
prices and manufacturers covered the most pressing needs a little more 
freely. 

Fine wool lower 

The bul.c of the trading in domestic wools was on 64s and finer 
qualities and by far the larger portion of the domestic fine wools sold 
were of the western lines. Prices, however, showed steady declines during 
January but have been steady during the first two weeks of February. The 
best original bag lines that were bringing around 81 cents at the end of 
December, sold before the close of January at. 75-77 cents, scoured basis. 
Original -wools of bulk: French combing staple of 64s and better quality that 
were selling in the range 75-78 cents, scoured basis, declined to the range 
73-75 cents. Some of the short combing wools of this grade moved at 70 
cents and slightly below. Graded strictly combing was mostly quiet with 
scattered sales as low as 78-80 cents, scoured basis. Graded French comb- 
ing declined from around 80 cents to the range 75-77 cents, scoured basis. 
Choice strictly combing offerings of 64s or finer Fleece wools declined 
moderately but this class .seemed to resist the pressure somewhat better 
than the western wools, partly because of more limited supplies. Ohio 
and similar wools of this class and grade sold during the month in the 
range 33-35 cents, grease basis, with the average scoured basis price 
around 80-81 cents. 

Medium wool prices decline 

Demand was rather slow on 58s, 60s wools. Territory strictly 
combing of this grade declined from 80-83 cents to 77-79 cents, scoured 
basis, and sales were very moderate in volume. Little business was done 
on Fleece wools of this grade. 



WOOL- 23 - 1 - 

Quotations eased steadily on i.6s and 48s, 50s grades of domestic 
wools. Scattered sales were reporiot on both Territory and Fleece lines 
of these grades. Scoured basis prices declined approximately six to 
ten cents per pound during the month. These declines were largely due 
to the extremely weak: condition of foreign markets for crossbred wools. 
The declines of domestic wools, ho.vever, tended to lag behind the declines 
on equivalent grade .vools abroad and domestic values //ere generally con- 
sidered above the level at which foreign vools could be imported. This 
price relationship was maintained through the moderately limited supplies 
of domestic medium .vools and the limited ' of ferings of spot foreign .vools. 
The policy of buzzing only -for immediate needs enabled holders to co.m-.and 
a premium on spot wools and this reacted f'tvor.^bly on our domestic med- 
ium grade wools. 

Texas 12-months wool was fairly steady. The last sales reported 
./ere around 80 cents, which was but a slightly lower figure than .vas ob- 
tained for the best offerings around the end of December. The supplies 
of choice Tectas wool of a full year's growth is reported to be quite limited. 
The situation in these lines is relatively much better as far as supplies 
are concerned than in January last year. 

L ittle demand for imported wools 

Business in foreign linos was very slow. Ho.vever, moderate quan- 
tities of spot wools, including Australian Merinos and South American and 
lie// Zealand cross breds were sold at steadily declining prices. Good 64s, 
70s Australian wools sold as low as 62-63 cents, and good combing 64s sold 
at 60 cents, scoured basis in bond. Small quantities of New Zealand 48s, 
50s Super wools sold at 39 cents, scoured basis in bond. Spot wools com- 
manded a premium over offerings' for import during the entire month. Orders 
for import ' were limited and for the most part covered only known requirements. 

Pulled wools in loss demand 

The market on wools suitable for woolen manufacture was quite irreg- 
ular. A fairly heavy volume of business in December had brought a firmer 
trend in prices. Demand failed to be sustained, ho.vever, during January 
and prices yielded to pressure especially after the decline at London. 

Noil mar.ot improves 

The noil market was fairly active at times and prices were fair y 
steady. The situation in noils had been improved somewhat by the increased 
demand and decreased production through declines in combing activity I rard 
the close of last year. Noil prices had suffered a much more drastic de- 
cline during 1929 than the general level of wool prices. 



i 



V/00L-23 



5 - 



Delivery of tops heavy, prices lever 

The top market .vas only moderately active during January. Speci- 
fications for prompt delivery accompanied practically all new orders, 
signifying a very Conservative buying policy on the part of. spinners. 
Prices on 64s top declined at least 5 cents a pound. Oil combed 64s that 
will spin a 50s yarn vas quoted at -#1.10 per pound at the end of December, 
out after the decline in wool at London and a sympathetic decline in domes- 
tic .vools, prices began slipping until less than .$1.05 .vas being offered 
and only most pressing requirements were being oovered at this figure by 
the end of January. Dry combed 64s sold as lo.v as ^1.00 per pound in 
January although early in the month a fair voltime of business had been 
placed at ^>1. 02-1. 05 per pound. One encouraging feature of the market '.vas 
the heavy deliveries. Spinners were taking deliveries very freely and in 
some cases topmakers' deliveries .vere heavier in volume than normal for 
January. Unfilled orders tended to decline as a result of heavy deliveries 
and slo.v placing of new orders. 

V/OOL: Price per pound at Boston, October to December 
1929 and January and February 1930 



Grade 




1929 




1930 


Oct 5 


' Nov 9 


Dec 7 


Jan 4 


Feb 8 




Cents s 


Cents ' 


Cents 


Cents ' 


Cents 


64s. 70s. 80s (fine) 
Strictly combing ■ 


38 


36-37 


• 35-36 


, 34-35 


- 33-34 




90-93 


86t9C 


85-88 


! 83-65 


: 78-81 


Territory scoured basis..- 

58s. 60s [%• . blood) 


88-93 


: 87-69 


85-87 


: 83-85 


■ 78-60 


Strictly combing 














, 44-45 


42-43 


: il-42 


: 40-41 


■ 36-37 




93-96 
: 93-96 


• 88-92 
87-90 


. 85-68 
• 85-87 


■ 80-83 
! 80-83 


■ 75-78 


56s (3/6 blood) 


l 75-78 


Strictly combine; 














: 45-46 


• 44-45 


! 41-42 


. 40-41 


- 36-37 


Fleece scoured basis 


85-88 


: 85-87 


. 76-83 


: 77-80 


■ 67-69 


46s (low l/4 blood) 
Strictly combing 


88-92 


i 65-90 


: 83-65 


• 78-80 


■ 66-71 






• 38-39 


• 38-39 


■ 36-37 


: 32-34 


Fleece scoured basis 


63-66 


i 63-65 


- 63-65 


■ 60-63 


53-57 


Territory scoured basis 


65-70 


: 65-70 


• 65-68 


: 62-67 


: 55-58 



Compiled from weekly Market Hows Reports of the Boston Office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, 



tfOOL-23 - 6 - 

Tne London Colonial wool sales 

The first series of the 1930 vool sales opened in London on Janu- 
ary 21 -with about 165,000 'baled of wool available for the auctions. Merino 
waols sold from 15 to 20 per cent oelow the close of the previous sales on 
December 4, and crossbred wools were from 20 to 25 per cent lower.. With- 
drawals of wool from the sales were very heavy and it was decided to close 
the sales on February 5 instead of on February 11 as originally announced. 
Toward the close of the sales competition improved. Tne wool sales closed 
on February 6 with .wools grading 64b and 70s selling 3 cents above the low 
point of the ssles. ft'ools grading 58s were 1 cent higher, 56s and 60s were 
unchanged and wools grading 50s and lower were about 1 cent lower than ai 
tne opening of the sales on January 21. 

LOUDON WOOL SALES: Prices at closing of the wool auctions reported 
on basis of the Official Standards of the United States for 
trades of 'wool (on scoured basis) 









1 


329 






1930 


United States 
















grades 


Jan 30 


: Mar 21 


Mai' 15 


July 23 


Oct 4 


Dec 4 


Feb 6 




Cents 


: Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


70s ... 




67.2 


: 63.1 


79.1 


71.0 


56.8 


59.8 


52.7 


64s ... 




80.1 


: 77-. 


73.0 


64.9 


53.7 


56.8 


49." 


60s' . . . 




75.0 


• 72.0 


66.9 


60.8 


48.7 


54.7 


43.6 


58s ... 




69.9 


• 64. 9 


60.8 


56.8 


• 46.6 


50.7 


41 . 6 


56s' . . . 




66.9 


: 60.8 


56.8 


. 52.7 


44.6 


47.6 


36.5 


50s' . . . 




50.2 


44.6 


-r3.6 


. 40.6 


36.5 


38.0 


: 30.4 


46s ... 




46.6 


! 42.6 


40.6 


. db.o 


35.5 


: 36 . 5 


28.4 


46s ... 




43.-6 


: 41.6 


59.5 


o7.o 


34.5 


: 35.5 


: 27.4 


44s . . . 




42.6 


39.5 


39.5 


34.5 


: 34.5 


35.5 


: 27.4 


40s' . . . 




41.6 


: 38.5 


38.-5 ■ 


. 36.5 


1 33.4 


: 34.5 


: 26.4 


36s . . . 




- 40. -6 


: 37.5 


27.-5 


: 37.5 


• 33.4 


: 34.5 


: 26.4 



Tabulated from reports of E. 
at London. 



A. Foley, United States Agricultural Commissioner 



Approximately 94,000 bales of wool were sold chiefly to Bradford and 
the Continent compared with 109, CCO bales in December. A few bales of cross- 
bred wools and slipes were reported sold for American account but there were 
no American orders for merino wools. About 65,000 bales of Colonial wools 
were held ovtjr for tne next series of sales'to be held on l.iarci. Id. Tne 
lollpwiu , table snows the quantities oi wool available at tne first sales in 
1929. and 1930, and also for tne sales'in Decemoer 1929. 



W00L-23 



- 7 - 



LONDON COLONIAL WOOL SALES i quantity of wool ' cataloged and 

sold- at London 



Country 



Wool cataloged by: 
Australia 
New South tfales 
Victoria ....... 

Queensland ' 

(Vest Australia . 
South Australia 
Tasmania 

Total 

New Zealand 

Cape 

South American . . 
All other 

Total 

Wool sold to: 

Continent 

United Kingdom . 
United States . . 

Total 



: 1929 


1930 


: Jan 30 ■ 


Lee. 4 


Feb 6 


' Bales ' : 


Bales : 


Bales 


: 27,257 


27,700 


38,928 


: 12,700 


15,000 


17,102 


: 15,824 


15,870 


17,206 


: 11; 888 


10,600 


12,632 


: 5 ; 516 


5 , 600 


5,610 


: 92 


100 


: 


: 73.077 


74,870 


. ■ 9-1,478 ■ 


: 23,829 


47 , 550 


: 26,312 


: 3,527 


4,050 


3,057 


: 1,039 


4,000 


: 2,729 : 


! 1,386 


6 , 53C 


: 3,586 


: 102,858 


137 , 000 


: 127,164 


: 49,000 


59,500 


> 

: 51,000 : 


: 31,000 


48,500 


: 42,000 : 


: 2 , 000 


: 1 , 000 


: 1 , 000 : 


: 82 , 000 


109,000 


: 94,000 : 



Trade and Consumption: Domestic 

Receipts at Boston are i.dgher^ 

Tne receipts of domestic wool at Boston during January 1930 amount- 
ed to 7,660,000 pounds compared with 4,632,000 pounds in January 1929. 
The total quantity of domestic wool arriving at Boston from March 1929 to 
February 1, 1930 amounted to 207 million pounds or about 6 million greater 
than during the same period last year but 7 million pounds less than in the 
1927 season.' . The following tabl.e shows monthly receipts of wool at Boston 
from January 1927 to January ] 930. 



WOOL, DOMESTI 


C: Receipts 


?.t Boston, by months, J-uvy-- 


• 1P37-1930 


Month 


: 1927 


: 1928 

; I ,000 pounds 
: 3,044 


1929 


193C 1/ 




=1,000 pounds 


: 1,000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


Jan 


: 6,081 


! 4,532 


7,660 


Feb 


: 6,577 


: 6,399 


1,836 




Mar 


: 8,600 


6,497 


5,738 




Apr' 


'9, '532*" ' 


• 8,138 


6 , 442 


■■• • ■ 


May, 


: 17,938 


. 25,843 


16,108 




June •" .'• — 


■'•'•"46,106' ':"■: 


'"'50V083- '" 


'• • -4o;T94 • • 




July 


55,877 


51,346 


56,870 




Aug 


29,891 


25,802 


32,377 




Sept ■ 


11,799- : 


! 7,156 


16,233 




Oct ' : 


9,033 : 


'4,598 


9,171 




Nov : ; 


8,972 : 


9', 322' ' : 


'"8,202 




Dec, ' : 


8,794 : 


7-.39S ' . 


8,257 





Compiled from. weekly reports of the Boston Wool Office' of the Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics.' ' 
1/ Preliminary ..... 

Machinery activity much lower ) ' 

The report of the Bureau of the Census on activity of wool machinery 
curing December 1929, showed considerable decreases compared with November 
1929 and December 1928, both in the actual- number of hours that the machines 
were in operation and in the per cent of maximum single-shift capacity. Woolen 
and worsted spindles reported only 589 million tiours activity in December com- 
pared with 653 million in-' November, 817 million in October 1929 and 709 mil- 
lion hours in December 1928. Looms, otner- than, carpet- looms, were active only 
7.7 million ndurs in December compared with- 8.3- million- nours in November and 
9-5 million hours in December 1928. The following table compares the activity 
of wool machinery in the United States during November and December 1929 and 
December 1928. 

Wool machinery activity in the United States during 
December 1928, and November 'and December 1929 







•' Percentage of total 


: Percentage 


of 




: Total number of hours 


: machinery active 




maximum 






: machines were active 


: at some time during 


: single- shi ft 


rfsol 




: month 




capacity 


" 


machinery 


Dec 


: Nov 


• Dec : Nov 


: Dec 


Nov 




: 1928 


1 1929 


1 1929 


1 1928 ; 1929 1 1929 


J 1928 


! 1929 


1929 




• 1 , 000 


' 1 , 000 


: 1,000 


! Per : Per : Per 


: Per 


: Per : 


Per 




: hours 


hours 


: hours 
: 1,023 


: cent : cent '• cent 
: 77.4 5 64.7 : 69.5 


' cent 


' cent 
63 . 2 


cent 


Cards 


' 1,167 


894 


83.4 


73.5 


Combs 

Spindles: 


: 399 


391 


: 439 


: 63.0 : 63.8 : 67.4 


73.5 


71.5 : 


61.7 


Woolen. . . . 


: 371, 994 


289,479 


321,690 


75.7 : 61.9 : 65.8 


80.3 


61.2 : 


69.3 


worsted. . . 
Looms: 


: 337, 093 


299,919 


330,850 


65.1 : 58.5 : 64.1 


66.1 


57.2 : 


65.4 


Wide ll ... 


: 7,899 


6, 


6,580 


62.1 : 51.8 : 53.9 


68.9 


54.3 : 


58.5 


Narrow 2/. 


: 1,625! 


1,449. 


1,746: 


63.7 : 56.9 : 65.7 . 


55.2 


53.0 : 


64.9 


Carpet 
















r 


: 1,270: 


1,163: 


1,375: 


68.3 : 60.3 : 65.9 : 


62.1 


55.1 : 


64.6 



Compiled from the Reports of Active 

the Department of Commerce. 

l/ Wider than 50-inch reed space. 



and Idle Wool Machinery, issued monthly by 
2_/ 50- in I space or less. 



W00L-23 



- 9 



Imports greater than last year 

Imports of wool into the United States during 1929 were considerably 
greater than last year and amounted to 277 million pounds compared with 
240 million pounds during 1928. Imports of combing and clothing wools 
were 11 million pounds greater than last year and carpet .vool imports were 
26 million pounds above 1928. 

During December, imports of combing and clothing wool amounted to 
4,499,000 pounds compared with 6,701,000 pounds last year "T.d 5,194,000 
pounds in November 1929. Carpet .vool imports were about 2 million pounds 
greater than during December 1928. The accompanying table sho.vs the im- 
ports of combing, clothing and carpet wools into the United States during 
December 1928 and 1929 and the total imports of .vool in both years. 

Imports of .vool into the United States during December 1928 and 1929 
and total imports from January 1 to December 31, 1928 and 1929 





Wool 


.-: Dec ! 


Jan 1 - 


Dec 31 




.': 1928 'S 1929 : 


1928 


1929 






: : 1,000 •: 1,000 ! 


1,000 ' 


1,000 






■: -pounds •': •■pounds ■ 


pounds 


■pound s 


Combing 


• •••••• 


. : 5,437 r; 3,443 j 


72,627 


83,710 


Clothing . . . 


• •*•••• 

• ••••• • 

• •••••• 


. • 1,264 : 1,056 • 


18,408 


• 18,488 


Total . . 


.. : 6,701, : . 4,4??, , 


.91,035 


. 102,198 


Carpet . . . . . . 


. . : 13,534 : 15,738 , 


149,326 


175,007 


Total . . 


. : 20,235 : 2C,237 ■ 


240,361 


• 277,205 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Coinmarce. 



Wool consumption much lower in December 



The consumption of wool in the United States by mills reporting to 
the Bureau of the Census during December declined nearly 8 per cent com- 
pared with November. Wool consumption during December amounted to 38 
million pounds (grease equivalent) compared '.vith 47 million pounds in 
November, 59 million pounds in October and 46 million pounds in December 
1928. About 57 per cent of the total .vool consumption reported in Decem- 
ber was domestic combing and clothing wool, 16 per cent was foreign combing 
and clothing wool and 27 per cent was carpet wool. 



W00L-23 



..- 10 - 



The quantity of combing and clothing .7 >ol consumed during December 
amounted fro 28,250,000 pounds compared with 32,163,000 pounds in iTovember, 
42, 53*, 000 pounds in October and a fiv.o year average for December 1924 - 
1928 of 34, 316 ,000 pounds. The consumption during December .7as the small- 
est for any month since June 1925 except May 1926 .7hich amounted to 
25,968,000 pounds. The foilo\7ing table sho.7s the consumption of wool by 
grades during Iloyembor and December .vith totals 1928 and 1929. 

WOOL:- Consumption in the United States, by grades, 
for specif ied -months, 1928 and 1929 1_/ 



Offic: 


ial standards of the* 

'd States for grades: 

of .vool : 


D 


:c 


Uov 


Jan 1 to Dec 


31 


Unite 


1928 


1929 


1929 


1928 ; 


1929 










1,000 


1,000 


!, 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 










pounds 


pounds 


pounds • 


pounds 


pounds 


Oi n ;bing and clo 


thing 


v;oo 1 : 
















64s 


'70s and 






11,617 
5,104 
5,240 
4,038 


9,177 

4,583 

4,356 

! 4,109 


11,373 
5,128 
4,684 
4,728 


118 

• 61 

I 63 

61 


,099 

,535 
,019 
,273 


142 
. 64 
. 65 
. 58 


,279 


58s 




285 


56s. 






,895 


48 s 


and 50 s. 


■ • • • • 


» • • ■ "♦ • J 


,181 


36 s 


. 40s, 44 
>tal c ,r ib 


s and 46s..; 

ing and . 


2,271 ' 


2,093 


1,988 


: 25 


,266 


29 


,371 


Tr 
















c 


lothing - 


TOOlS 




26 ,'270 '< 


24,318" 


•' 27 ,'901 


329 


,192 


: 360 


,011 


Carpet 


12,204 


9,081 


13,558 


135 


,826 


156 


102 


rial all • 


700 IS 


> • • • • «i 




Tc 


40 t 474 


33,399 


41 ,45,9 


465 


,018 


516 


,113 



Compiled from data in the "Wool Consumption Reports" issued by the Bureau 

of the Census. 
1/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as published by 

the Bureau of the Census, and have not been reduced to a grease basis, 



The foregoing table shows that the consumption of combing and cloth- 
ing wools increased 31 million pounds during 1929 compared with 1928. The 

r -.test increase was in the consumption of domastic 64s-S0s vhich was 28 
million rounds greater than last year. The consumption of foreign 58s-60s 
and 56s each increased over 6 million pounds. The greatest iodine ' 

■ as in domestic i8s-5Cs which was 7 million pounds under last year, 
ionsumption of carpet wools increased ever 20 million pounds in 1929. 



V/OPL-23 



- 11 









"/00L: Cuns 


5ur.: itiuri in ti i rnito< 


I States, 


by classes, 






January - December 1929 l/ 




Month j Total 


Combing 


Clothing 


Carpet 


Domestic 


Foreign 


: 1,000 • 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 i 


1,000 


1,000 


. : pounds 


pounds 


pound s 


pounds ' 


pounds 


pounds 


Jan • . . . .: 47,789 ■ 


• 26,649- 


7,005 


14,135 • 


26,640. • 


21,149 


Feb . 






: .: 41,373 


21,318 


6,716 ■ 


, 13,339 


21,273 


20,100 


Mar 






' .: 41,584 


22,416 


. 6,660 


l 12,488 < 


21,367 


. 20,217 


Apr 






' .: 42,776 


23,186 


6,705 


12,883 


22,659 


: 20,117 


May 






• . : 42,764 


21,962 


6,568 


14,234 ■ 


21,482 


: 21,282 


June 






. : 38 , 539 


20,954 


5,985 


11,600 


20,638 


■ 17,901 


July 






• .: 42,148 i 


23,990 


5,632 


•12,526 


. 24,122 


. 18 .026 


Aug 






' . : 46,983 


27,292 • 


6,190 


13., 601 • 


• 27,083 


: 19,900 


Sept . 






' .: 44,439 j 


- 25,662 ■ 


6,065 


12-, 7 12- ■ 


26,213 


: 16,226 


Oc't 






. .: 52,860 


29 ,365 


7,450 


. 16,045 


, 30,569 


: 22,291 


Nov 






.: 41,459 • 


22,562 


: 5,339 


• 13,558 • 


22,604 


• IS, 855 


Dec 






.: 33,399 


19, '955 • 


4,363 


: 9,081 ■ 


18,972 


: 14,427 



Compiled from monthly r.enorrts of the Bureau of thy- Census. 
1_/ These are totals of .grease, .scoured and pulled wools, as published 
: by the Bureau of the Census, and have not been reduced to a grease 
basis. 



Stocks of -viol, tops and noils 



Stocks of wool, tops anrl noils held by dealers and manufacturers in 
the United States -on January 1, 1930 amounted to 318 million pounds (grease 
equivalent) compared .vith 310 million pounds on January 1, 1929 and 370 
million pounds on October 1, 1929. '. However, the stocks of combine and cloth- 
ing wools were nearly 11 million pounds less than last year, amounting to 
209 million pounds compared to 220 million pounds on the same date last 
year. Combing and clothing tops and noils, however, were nearly 4 million 
pounds greater than last year. Stocks of crpet wools ,vero about 10 mil- 
lion pounds heavier than oh January 1, 1929. 

The following table, shows the holdings of grease, scoured and pulled 
wool, tops and noils in the United States by grades, for January 1, 1929 
and 1930.- In. using this table it should be noted. that the item "Grade 
not stated" amounted to 15 .million p. -ar. is in 1929 and 20 million pounds 
in 1930. This item includes viol in original bags, or ungraded or mixed 
wools on v/hich the dealers, reporting could not accurately specify grades. 



WOOL- 2 3 



-12 -. 



Stoclcs of -•' >ol , tops and roils held by dealers and manufacturers 
in tho Unitoi States on Janaary 1, 1929 and 1930 



January 1 ' Grease : 


Scoured: 


Pulled : 


Tops : 


Foils : 


Total 


: .1,000 - 
: pounds 


.1,000 ! 
,}.• )und.s: 


1,000 : 
pounds i 

1,610 
1,480 

: 2,504 
: 2,648 

: 5,411 
: 7,386 

: 2,905 
: 2,271 

• 1,113 
: 966 

: 1 


1,000 : 
rounds: 


1,000 : 
pnund s • 


1,000 
pounds 


Combing and Clothing : i 

'.70 Ol 

Fine (64s, 70s, 80s) : 

1929 : 7^,341 


4,573 
. 5,019 

3,619 
2,856 

: 5,368 
: 6,413 

: 4,893 
: 4,652 

: 1,915 
: 1,570 

: 110 
: 283 


5,310 
. .4,592 

: 2,146 
: 2,600 

! 2,123 
: 2,525 

: 1,653 
: 2,362 

: 1,214 
: 1,562 


.2,607 
: 4,501 

1,511 
: .2,312 

: 1,707 
: 1,746 

: 1,225 
: 1,305 

: 389 
• -367 


. 67,841 


1930 .....: 58,200 

%■ blood (58s, 60s) : 

1929.....'...: 21,245 


■ 73,792 
: 31 ,027 


19^0. ....... : 20,560 


: 30,976 


3/8 blood (56s) : 

1929 : 16,986 


: 31,595 


i blood (46s, 50s) : 

1929 : 16,935 


: 35,586 

: 27,611 


1930 : 17,000 


: 27,790 


Lo-.v (36s to 46s) : 

1929 : 17,004 


: 21,635 


1930 : 14,767 

Grade not stated : 

1929 : 15,050 


: 19,272 

• 15,160 
: 19,664 


Total combing and: 
clothing : 

1929 : 160,561 


« 20,477 


: 13,7 t 3 


: 12,448 


: 7, -5x0 


• 214 








: 20,993 


: 14,752 


: 13,661 


: 10,252 


5 207,279 



Carpet '-'Pol 

1929. 
1930. 



Total ./ool stocKs 
19;: 9 



1930 



±1,671; 
51,667: 



1,544 
2,414 



202,432: 22,021 



199,5065 23,407 



Domestic j 1929 

1930 

F ireJ -n: 1929 

1930 

1929 

193'.- 



118,233: 

116, ' : 

.199; 

6 3.046: 



16,014 

17,157 

5,977 

6.250 



'■■'■•.' : 



X/ • ■" "' • ' ily. 



to , 8 ] 



1,391 
1,48 t 



15,134 



16.236 



1,018: 350: 46,174 

625: 266: 56,876 



13, .66: 7,990: 261, 



14,486' 10,518 5 264,155 



10,608 

12,365 

, 526 
3.671 



,179 
21,648 



1/ 
1/ 



. 932 
. 972 



1/ 
1/ 

ii 



15,980 
21 . 



14 ,,665 

145 , 

,702 
93.168 



309,566 
317.978 



WOOL- 23 



- 13 - 
Tra^.e anl Consumption; F-^r?ifm 



Bradford shows slight improvement 

The Bradford wool market is slightly more active and nachinery 
activity has increased except in the spinning and weaving sections of 
the industry according to a cable received by the Foreign Service of the 
Department of Agriculture from Consul Mac.itee at Bradford. The majority 
of manufacturers, ho.vever, are refraining from heavy purchases of tops 
and yarns until after the effect of the Australian control of wool supplies 
can be determined. Hew orders indicate expected improvement in fin'e 
worsteds and heavy woolens. 

The total weight of wool and tops passing through the Bradford Con- 
ditioning House during January ffas considerably greater than for December. 
The quantity of ffool tops conditioned was about 500,000 pounds more than 
last month and amounted to 3,720,000 pounds compared with 3,238,000 pounds 
in December and 3,763,000 pounds in Hovember 1929. The quantity of worsted 
yarn weighed amounted to 242,000 pounds which is the highest for any month 
last year except Hovember which was 274,000 pounds. The table on page 18 
shows the quantity of wool, tops and yarns passing through the conditioning 
houses of Braiford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Verviers for the past six months. 

WOOL, TOPS AHD YARH: Price per pound at Bradford on specified 
dates, December 1928 - January 1930 





Date 




64s 


1/ 




50 s 1/ 






: Scoured 
wool : 


' Tops 


Worsted 
yarn 
2 /46 s 


Scoured 
wool 


Tops 


V/orsted 
yarn 
2/3 2 s 






: Cents, 


Cents : 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


1928 - 
















Dec 






97.3 


127.7 


52.7 


57.8 


82.1 


1929 - 
















Jan 


26 


..: 87.2 . 


97.3 


: 129.7 


51.7 


59.8 


83.1 


Feb 


23 


...: 81.1 


91.2 


125.7 


48.7 


• 56.8 


: 80.1 


Mar 


23 


. .: 79.1 


( .90.2 


125.7 


: 46.6 


: 56.8 


78.1 


Apr 


23 


..: 78.0 


89.2 


125.7 


48.7 


56.8 


• 78.0 


May 


25 


. .: 75.0 . 


85.2 


: 119.6 


45.6 


54.7 


77.0 


June 


25 


..: 74.0 


83.1 


: 117.6 


44.^ 


53.7 


. 77.0 


July 


25 


. .: 68.9 . 


, 79.1 


: 115.6 


42.6 


: 50.7 


: 75.0 


Aug 


25 


..: 66.9 


77.0 


: 113.6 


40.6 


49.7 


> 73.0 


Sept 


25 


. .: 56.8 


68.9 


: 103.4 


39.5 


: 46.6 


• 68.9 


Oct 


25 


. . : 62.9 . 


73.0 . 


: 103.4 


39.5 


• 46.6 


: 67.9 


Nov 


25 


..: 62.9 


71.0 . 


, 1C3.4 


: 39.5 


47.6 


: 67.9 


Dec 


23 


. .: 58.8 


64.9 


: 99.4 


35.5 


• 42.6 


64.9 


1930 - 
















Jan 


25 


. .: 49.7 


59.8 


! 91.2 


29.4 


. 38 . 5 


60.8 


1/ Official stan 


lards of the 


United I 


States for 


wool and \ 


/ool ton: 


3 • 



W00L-23 



- 14 - 



British exports increase d 

The exports of v/ool manufactures from Great Britain increased during 
January according to a cable from Agricultural Commissioner E. A. Foley 
at London. The exports of wadilen and worsted yarns amounted to 3,710,000 
pounds compared with 3,390,000 pounds in December and 4,120,000 pounds dur- 
ing November 1929. Exports of woolen and worsted piece goods were consid- 
erably higher during January, amounting to 14,090,000 square yards compared 
with 11,410,000 square yards in December and 10,820,000 square yards in 
November. 

Imports of wool into Great 3ritain during January amounted to over 
95 million pounds compared with 78 million pounds last month and 49 million 
pounds in November 1929. The following table compares the exports and im- 
ports of wool and wool manufactures during November and December 1929 with 
January .1930 . 

UNITED KINGDOM; Trade in rfool and wool manufactures. 
November and December 1929 and January 1930 



Exports and imports 



Unit 



1929 



Nov 



Dec 



1930 



Jan 



Exports - 

V/ool 

Tops 

Yarns, woolen 
Yarns, worsted . 
Tissues, woolen 
Tissues, worsted 
Flannels and delan 
Carpets and rugs 
No i 1 s . . ... ... 

W£LS t Q ■ • • ' • • . • 

Y/oolen rags . . 
Imports - 

V/ool 

Tops ....... 

Waste .and noils 

Yarns 

Tissues, woolen 
Tissues, .vorsted 
Carpets and rugs 
V/o»len rags . . 



Compile vigat 

ports from Agricultural C 





1,000 • 


1,000 : 


1,000 




pounds 


pounds ■ 


pounds 


pound ■ 


5,900 


3,600 ; 


3,100 


ii 


2,900 


: 1,900 • 


2,700 


ii ■ 


670 


! 480 


530 


ii , 


3,450 


2,910 


3,180 


sq yd 


7,600 


: 7,840 


9,700 


ii it , 


3,220 . 


: 3,570 


- 4,390 


n ii 


440 


340 


300 


ft ft 


. 590 . 


! . 180 


560 


pound 


1,500. 


: 1,100 


• 1,000 


it 


1,200. 


: 900 


1,000 


tt 


2,100 


: 1,570 


3,470 


pound 


48,700 


1 77,800 


, 95,400 


ii 


100. 


:. 100 


■ 100 


it 


: . 300 . 


: . 400 


: 400 


ii 


1 1,680 


> 2,060 


. 1,930 


sq yd 


2,170 


: 1,6 30 


2,040 


ii it 


360 


: 590 


820 


ii it 


690 


: 790 


700 


1 ound 


4,030 


■ 4,480 


4,030 



ion of the United Kingdom and cabled re- 
issioner Foley at London. 



TOOL-23 

Germany 



- 15 - 



The German market for wdol and tops was quiet during January but there 
was a fair interest in noils, according to Agricultural Commissioner Steere 
at Berlin, Tne improvement recently reported in industrial activity has been 
followed by a slight lull in trade. Occupation is still good in the worsted 
section of tne industry but new orders are lacking. The depression in the 
woolen spinning industry continues. 

Stocks of tops in the commission combing establishments of Germany on 
February 1, were about 1 million pounds more than on January 1, 1930 but were 
about 1,500,000 pounds less than on December 1, 1929. Stocks of merino tops 
on February 1, 1930 amounted to 4,885,000 noands and crossbred tops amounted 
to 7,641,000 pounds. 

TOPS: Stocks held hy Continental commission combing establishments 



Location and 


: 1928 


: 1929 


: 1 


330 


description 
of wool 


.'Dec 1 


; Jan 1 


[ Feb 1 


; Dec.l 


; Jan 1 


. Feb 1 




■ 1,000 


: 1,000 


! 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: ' 1,000 


Belgium - 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


Merino .... 


: '2,465 


: 2,405 


: 2,158 


: 1,914 


: 1 , 980 


: 2,055 


Crossbred. . 


: 2 , 544 


' 2,480 


: 2,260 


: 3,966 


: 3,937 


: 3 , 829 


Total 


: 5,009 


4,885 


: 4,418 


: 5,880 


5,917 


5,884 


Germany - 














Merino .... 


6,409 


6,493 


7,218 


4,747 


4,339 


4,885 


Crossbred . 


8,708 


8,155 


6,312 


9.469 


7,039 


7,641 


Total ... 


15,117; 


14,648. 


13,530 . 


14,216 


1 11,378 


12 , 526 


France - ! 














Merino .... : 


10,622: 


10,778 


12,189 : 


12,348 


13,470 ! 


14,493 


Crossbred.. : 


12,983: 


13 , 446 


12,698 


16,413 


16,916 


16,828 


Total 


23,605; 


24,224. 


24i 887 


28,761 


30,386 


31,321 


Italy - .: 














Merino .... : 


615: 


677: 


7o9 


785 


946 


1,054 


Crossbred . : 


1,501: 


1,554: 


1,393 


2,249 : 


2,114 


2,187 


Total ... j 


2,116; 


2,231, 


2,162 ! 


3,034 , 


3,060 


3,241 



Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Commissioner Steere at merlin. 



»i00L-23 



- 16 - 



WOOL: Imports into Belgium. Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Italy, 
Japan, Poland, United Kingdom and United States for specified 

months, 1925 



Country and item 


: Aug 


: Sept 


. Oct 


Nov 


. Dec 


Belgium - 


; i.ooo 

' Dounds 

: 14,204 
: 419 


; 1,000 

' pounds 

: 10,865 
: 246 


; 1,000 
'. pounds 

7,049 
241 


: 1,000 
pounds 

8,462 
: 371 


j 1,000 
pounds 

14,869 




390 






Total 


: 14,623 


: 11,112 


: 7,290 


8,833 


15,259 






Czechoslovakia - 

France, row pnd on 


: 1,964 
30,766 

11,706 
1,307 

9,659 
1,160 


: 2,976 
: 26,602 

■ 6,153 
1,057 

4,851 
: : 778 


: 1,649 
25,282 

' 4,700 
1,209 

5,025 

1,215 


•33,718 

8,271 
776 

2,244 . 
801 


I 1/ 
1/ 

17,919 


Germany - 

Wool, merino, greasy .. 


Wool, merino, 


1,073 


Wool, crossored, 
greasy and 


: 3,791 


Wool, crossbred, 








Total 


23,832 


12,839 


12,149 


12,092 


23,638 


Italy - 


6,255 

789 


3,607 
682 


3,522 
1,254 






Wool, washed 










.2,044 


4,489 


4,576 


1/ 


1/ 


Japan - 

Poland - : 

United Kingdom - j 

United States - ; 
Wool, . and : 


3 ,' 801 
2,026 : 
32,772 

12,732 : 
3,899 


735 . 
2,200 
18,125 

15, 
5,042 


2,851 
2,116 : 
21,997 

14,; 

5,041 ' 


1/ 

1/ ' : 
48,7 

. -89 
5, c 


i/ 

1/ 

77,800 

13, 




6, 








16,631 


18,091 ; 


19,255 . 


19,323 : 


20,237 



Compiled from reports cabled by the Agricultural Commissioners at 
Berlin pnd London and reports from the International Institute of Agriculture 
at Rome. 

i/ Not reported. 



W00L-23 



- 17 - 



France 

The market for tops and noils continued quiet during January accord- 
ing to Agricultural Commissioner Steere. Industrie 1 activity was good but 
declining- slightly and new orders- were very scarce from both the domestic 
and,' the export trade. 

Prices of crossbred 56s tops declined 8 cents and merino tops de- 
clined 10 cents during .'the month. Australian merino and corssbred noils 
declined 4 to 5 cents below the price on January 1, and Cape noils were 
10 cents lower. Merino, and Cheviot yarns declined 11 to 12 cents during 
the month. 



WOOL, TOPS AND YABN: 



Price per pound in France, specified dates, 
1929 and 1930 



: 




192< 






1930 


Item 


Aug 29 


. Oct 3 


• Nov 1 


. Dec 5 


Jan 2 


Feb 1 




Cents 


Cents : 


. Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Tops, Australian- 














Merino 6,4s warp 


. 93.3 


• 89.2 : 


82.1 


77.0 


73.0 


62.9 




. 74.0 


71.0 : 


64.9 


61.8 


58.8 


50.7 


Tops, Argentine - 
















70.0 


68.9 : 


60.8 


57.8 


: 


48.7 


Noils- 














Australian merino . . . 


80.9 


78.2 : 


71.1 


- 69.3 


62 .2 


56.9 


Australian crossbred. 


57.6 


58.6 : 


49.8 


: 48.0 


43.5 


39.1 




85.3 


. 


76. 4 


74.6 


67.5 


56.9 


Yarn - 
















112.0 : 
86.3 


: 103.1 : 
80.9 : 


104.4 
80.9 


106.3 
: 83.6 


104.4 
80.9 


93.7 




68.4 



Stocks of tops in commission comoing establishraeaie, in Frtcnce'-on 
February 1, were nearly 1 million pounds greater than on January 1, 1930 and 
about 2 l/2 million pounds greater than on December 1, 1929. Stocks of 
merino tops on February 1, amounted to 14,493,000 pounds and crossbred tops 
to 16,828,000 pounds. 



The quantities of wood, tops and yarns passing through, the condition- 
ing houses at Roubaix and Tourcoing during January were somewhat greater than 
last month. The quantity of tops was nearly 1,400,000 pounds greater than 
in December and the quantity of yarn weighed was over 1 million pounds greater 
thaja last month. 



•K00L-23 



- li 



rtOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Amount passing through conditioning houses 
at Bradford, Roub^ix.Tourccing and Verviers, 1929-1930 



Locacion and 
class 



1929 



1930 



Aug 



Sept 



Oct 



'Nov 



Tec 



Jan 



Bradford - 

(Tool . 

Tops . 

Yarn . 
Roubaix 

Wool . 

Tops . 

Yarn . 
Tourcoing - 
.Wool . 

Tops . 

Y;rn . 
Vervier 

Wool . 
•Tops . 
: Yorn . 



1,000 
pounds 

644 

3,61? 

118 

214 

5,044 
1,299 

2,478 
7,831 
2,277 

2,083 
' 211 ■' 
i 747 



1,000 
pounds 

771 

4,120 

165 

215 
■4,-506-' 

1,007 

2,319 
5,873 
1,976 

1,351 
124 
296 



1,000 
pounds 

878 

4,337 
180 

234 
€ r 7-22-~ 

1,583 

2,994 
8,699 
2,438 

3,513 

4:06 

820 



1,000 
pounds 

553 

3,763 

274 

276 
5,765 
1 , 453 

2,700 
8,571 
2,015 

2,886 
522. 
769 



1,000 

pounds 

563 

3,'238 
236 

203 

3,404 

1,446 

2,496 
5,797 
1,202 

2,251 

■ 203 

873 



1,000 
pounds 

630 

3,720 

242 

265 
4,226 
1,543 

2,690 
6,347 
2,196 

1/ 

i 7 / 



Compiled from cabled. reports from Agricultural Commissioner Steere 
at Berlin- and. Consul Thomson at, Bradford. 



l/ ■ Not reported. 



Production: • United States 



Production in United States in c reased 



.The' amount of wool shorn in the United States in 1929 amounted to 
309 .million pounds and to 304 million pounds in 1928, according to the 
revised estimate's of the Department of Agriculture. The increase in wool 
production is largely due to increase in sheep numbers as the average 
weight per fleece in the United States was slightly less in 1929 than in 
1928. Texas, Montana and California showed the largest increases in wool 
production over 1928 and Utah showed the largest decrease. 

The following table shows the number of sheep shorn,' the average 
weight per fleece and the quantity of wool shorn in the United States and 
in all States producing over 5 million pounds of wool -in 1929. The quant . 
of pulled wool produced in the United States in 1929 amounted to 54 l/2 mil- 
lion pounds or nearly 3 million pounds more than was produced in 19: . 



W00L-23 



- 19 - 



Wool production in the United States and in States 
producing over 5 million pounds, 1928-1929 



State 


: ' number 
: sheep shorn' 


; Weight 
per' fleece : 


Wool pre 


>duct ion 




1928 


: 1929 


1928 


; 1929 


1928' ■ 


1929 


XGXSLS *•••••••• 

Montana, 

Wyoming 

California. . . . 

U li ■ l\. i ••••••••••i 

Oregon 

Idaho 

New Mexico .... 

Ohio 

Colorado 

Michigan 

Nevada 

Iowa 

South Dakota. . 

Arizona 

Missouri 

Minnesota 

Washington. . . . 


s. . . 


Thou- -! 
sands 

4,500 
3,096 
3,010 
3,500 
. 2,480 
2,210 
1,944 
2,138 
1,802 
1 , 310 
1,065 
1 , 144 

: 745 
724 

[' 960 
• 828 

: 590 
527 


Thou- 
sands ' 

4,859 
3,341 
3,130 
3,770 
2,347 

. 2,271 

> 2,026 
2,147 
1,781 
1,386 
1,100 
1,031 

! 813 

76 5 

1,020 

845 

651 

! 560 


Pounds : 

8.5 • 

8.6 ■ 
8.8- 

: f.6 

; 8.9 

9.2 

9.2 

6.4 
■ 8.2 

7.6 
! 8.0 

7.5 
{■-: 8.0 

: 8.3 

: '6.0 

7.2 

7.9 

10,0 


Pound's : 

8.5' 

8.6 

8.3 ' 

6.8 

8.1 

8.3 

8.8 
! 6.8 

8.1 
: 7.2 

7.8 
: 7.2 

7.9 
: 7.7 

6.0 
: . 7.1 

7.9- 

9.0 


1,000 
pounds 

38,200 

26,626 • 

26,488 

23,800 

22,072 

20 , 332 

17,885 

13,683 

• 14,776 

9,956 

: .8,520 

- 8,580 

: 5,960 

: 6,009 

I 5,760 

•' 5,962 

: 4,661 

5,270 


1,000 
pounds 

41,300 

28,733 

26,000 

25,635 

39,011 

: 18,849 

17,829 

: 14,600 

14,426 

9,979 

: 8,580 

: 7,423 

: 6,423 

! 6,352 

: 6,120 

. 6,000 

: 5,143 

; 5,040 


Total 


32,573 


33,863 


8.1 


7.9 


264,540 


267,444 


All other State 


6,162 


6,562 


6.4 


6.3 


39,175 


41,30 3 


Total United States 


38,735 


40,425- 


7.8 


.7.6 


' 303,715 


: 308,947 


Pulled wool 







! 





; 51,900 


: 54,500 


Total 'wool pro- 
duction 










• 355,615. 


: 363,447 



Prospects for 1930 



Production; Fore i gn 



Present indications are for a 1930 world wool clip, exclusive of 
Russia and China, not greatly different from the large clips of 1928 and 
1929. Seasonal conditions in both Australia md Argentina, which' suffered 
from drought during 1929, are improving while conditions in other southern 
hemisphere countries are reported as good, with sheep numbers' above a year 
ago. The number of sheep in New South Wales which produce's over hulf the 



W00L-23 - '20 



wool in Australia at the beginning of 1929 was estimated at 52,700 ,CC0 an 
increase of 8 per cent over 1928 and was] only 4 per cent bo low the high 
figure of 54,630,000 reported at the ..beginning of 1927. Owing to unfavor- 
able seasonal conditions during most of 1929 sheep numbers in this State 
on January 1, 1930 will probably show a reduction. Other countries of 
the southern hemisphere report satisfactory lambing percentages. In New 
Zealand breeding ewes in April 1929 numbered 16 ,'608 .,000 or 7 per cent more 
than in 1928. Estimates place the number of lanlbs in 19-29 at 14,722,000 
or 10 per cent above the corresponding figure fo'r 1928. : According -to 
averages computed over the last five years the number of lambs estimated 
represents 98 per cent of actual number tailed or saved. ■• Applying this 
average to the present season it would appear that the number -tailed vill 
be slightly over 15,000,000 against an average of 12,800,000 for -the four 
preceding years. ■ • • ....... 

The number of ewes -and UegS'in the Province of Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina at the beginning 'of 1929 v?as 62,000 above 1928 and higher than any 
year since 1925. In the Union 'of South -Africa wooled sheep on June 30, 
1929 numbered 38,218,000 or 6 per cent above 1928. 

The number of breeding ewes -in l/ 8 European countries for which 
figures are avails 1 . ble : were estimated at '31,^35,000 in 1929 or approximately 
the same as in 1928. In the United States the number of breeding -ewes 1 
year and over on January 1, 1930 was estimated at 32,602,0C0 against 
31, 530, COO a year ago. ■ ■ .... 

World production in 1929 , ■ 



Wool production for 1929 for marketing during season 1929-30 2/ in 19 
countries which usually furnish about four-fifths of the world's clip, 
exclusive of Russia <nd China, is now estimated at 2,687 million pounds 
or about the same as the large clip of 1928. The supply -for • the selling 
season 1929-30, including production and carryover from, the 1928-29 season 
in the primary markets of the southern hemisphere, is estimated at about 
1-g- per cent above the preceding season.' Increases, in production in 1929 
are reported in New Zoaland, Uruguay, the Union of South Africa, the 
United States and Canada vi th decreases reported for Australia, Argentina 
and most European countries. 



1/ England and ".Tales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Iris): Fieo St-i 4 . 
Germany, Hungary and Rumania. 

2/ Australia, New Zealend, Argentina, Uruguay, Union of South Africa, 
United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Prance, Germany, \", 

rreece, Rumania, Latvia, Estonia, l">r:;L.y, Yugoslavia, Ba] 

Lithuania. 



WOOL- 23 - 21 -.. 



Australia 



The Australian official estimate of production still stands at 
925,000,000 pounds against 950,000,CCO pound? in 1928 with the amount 
to be received intb store for the season as estimated by the National 
Council of Wool Selling Brokers remaining unchanged at 2,585,000 bales 
against 2,690,000 bales for the preceding season. It '.•.'as reported 
earlier that a change would be made in this estimate, but at the Novem- 
ber meeting of the National Council of Wool Selling Brokers, after a 
careful review of the matter it was decided to adhere to the original 
estimate. Taking into account the decrease in the average weight of 
bales this year of about 9 pounds for tho first 5 months of the season 
compared with a year ago the receipts of wool into store in Australia 
from the beginning of the season up to January 1, 1929 aggregate 
697,500,000 pounds, a decrease of 8 per cent compared with last season. 



New Zealand 

The condition of the current clip in New Zealand now estimated 
at 255,000,000 pounds or 6 per cen^ above last year may not be so good 
as that of last year on account of the more or less wet winter and late 
spring 'according to the Pastoral Review. , A proposal that New Zealand 
wool sales be spread over the whole year did nfet meet the approval of 
the majority of buyers. 



Argentina 

Increased arrivals of wool on the market show that the selection 
in Buenos Aires leaves much to be desired. Owing to inferior color and 
the larger quantity of burrs, there would appear to be practically no 
super crossbred .vool available, Concordia ?nd Entre Rios second clip 
wool are now coming on the market and the season's clip is good. The 
total Argentine clip is estimated at 3^0,000,000 pounds for 1929, a de- 
crease of 4 per cent compared with the preceding year. 

Uruguay 

During the past year conditions have been good for wool produc- 
tion and the selection on the market is excellent. Flocks have been 
healthy and pasture sufficient. Production is estimated at 150,000,000 
pounds or 8 per cent above 1928. 



VWOL-23 



Sheep numbers in 1_/ 19 countries reporting at the beginning or 
in the summer of 1929 reached 267,215,000 against 257,628,000 in 1920 
and 250,242,0C0 in 1909-191^. & reduction of 1 per cent is shown in 
the European countries 'report ing, but important wool producing 'coun- 
tries of the Southern Hemisphere , the-United States End Canada showed 
increases. Sheep numbers in the United States on January 1, 1930 
reached 48,913,000 against 47,509,000 in 1929 and 43,235,000 the aver- 
age for the 5 years 1909-1913. Sheep numbers in this country have 
increased steadily since 1922. In Canada the number on June 1929 //as 
3,728,000 an increase of 9 per cent over 1928. The number in that • 
country has been increasing regularly smci 1924 and is now above.-, the 
previous high figure reported in 1920. In Australia sheep numb.is 
at the beginning of 1929 reached the high figare of 106,000,000 show- 
ing an increase of more than 5,000,000 over the number at the beginning 
of 1928 when they had been reduced by drought. 



Argentina and Uruguay, both important wool growing countries of 
the Southern Hemisphere are not included in the- above 16 countries due 
to lack of estimates forrecent years. Unofficial estimates place the 
number of sheep in Uruguay in 1929 at 19,358,000 compared with 14,443,000 
reported by the census of 1924, Reliable unofficial estimates place 
the number in Argentina between 36,C0C,000 and 40,000,000. The de- 
creases in the Province of 3uenos Aires are believed to be offsat to 
some extent by increases in the southern provinces. Estimates for the 
province of Buenos Aires, alone, sro.v that at the beginning of 1929 
there were 12, 4-16, 000 sheep in that province, a slight reduction from 
1928. The number of ev/es and tegs, however, was 9,686,000 or 62,000 
above 1928 and was higher than for any year since the beginning of 1925. 



!_/ Canada, United States, England and 7ales, Scotland, llorth Ireland, 
Irish Free State, France', Germany, Fungpry, Greece, Rumania, 
Latvia, Yugoslavia, Estonia, Algeria, Tunis, Uganda, Australia 
and Hew Zealand. 



WOOL- 23 



- 23 4 



BEEEDIiK E.ffiS: Trend in numbers- in certain countries, 1924-1929 



Country 



..Date.,... 



.... 1.92,4 . 



...1925 :' 1926 



1927 



1928 



1929 



193C 



Thou- 
sands^ 



United States 1/ . 
New : S. Sales 1/ . 
South Australia 2/ 
Western Australia 
New Zealand . . : . . . 

Iceland ",.'.' 

England and nil ales 

Isle of Man 

S co 1 1 and . . . 

North Ireland ; . . 
Irish Free State 
France l/ 2/ . . : . . 
Germany l/ 2_/ ... 
Czechoslovakia .2/ 
Hungary 1/ . 
Rumani a 2/ . 
Yugoslavia 
Poland 1_/ . . 
Spain 2/ . . . 
Argentina - 
Prov. of Buenos 
Aires 3/ . . ... 

Uruguay lj 

Algeria 4/ .. 

Japan 2/ 



Jan. 1 ' 
June 30' 
J an'.. 
Jan'. 
Apr. 30 

June .' 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan* • 

Ja.n* 

Jan. 

April 

Jan.; 

Jan.. 

Jan.: 



June 



June; 



21,67.0 

3,516 

13,076 

,.. 421 

5, 994 

34 

2,992 

226 

1,236 

6,115 



995 
9,273 
±,356 



Tr. j Ji— : 
sands : 

25,769 

23 , 040 

3,179 

'3 , 377 

13,715 

379 

6,397 

36 

3,056 

216 

,<d24 

6,256 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



1,-08* 

9,894 
5,0c0 



: 36, 459 

: 25, 920 
:■ 3,389 
: 3,529 
:13,948 
: ' 393 
: ' 6,755 
: : 39 
: ''3,115 
: : 234 
: '1,28-1 
: : 6,-r9'3 
:.'2,907 
; '• : 612 
: :i, 037 
: :9,461 
: "'5 , 032 



10,170 
3,115 

11: 



10,813: 



9,682: -9,516 

3,570: 3,939 
, 12: •- 13 



27,704 

27,770 

3,605 

3,800 

14,832 

6,962 
.40 
3,239 
264 
1,344 
5,635 
2,542 

963 

10,019 

5 , 094 

1,492 



9 , 6 ; 23 

2 , 9'84 
15 



29,591 

26,262 

3,699 

4,309 

15,534 

6,847 
40 
3,275 
277 
1,392 
6,510 
2,379 

925 

9,780 



31,530 



16,608 

6,712 

3,246 
289 
1,670 
6, 473 
2,262 



919 
9,764 



Thou- 
sands ' 

32 , 602 



2,185 



9,686 



14 



Compiled from official sources and t 

l/ Estimated nusaber, of breeding ewes 

2/ Estimates for countries reporting 

January of tne following year. 

3/ Ewes and tegs. 

4/ Ewes and ewe. lambs.- 



he International Institute of Agriculture, 
1 year and over, 
as of December have been considered as of 



WOOL- 23 



- 24 - 



Estimated production in the grecse, average 1909-1913, annual 

1925 - 1929 



Country 



Average 
1909-1913 

■1/ 



1925 



1926 



192'7 



1928 



1929 
Prelim- 
inary 



SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE 



Australia ......... 

New Zealand 

Argentina ........; 

Uruguay ,.........: 

Union of South MtH 
Total 5 Southern 
Hemisphere 
countries . . . 

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE 



United States 

Fleece 

Pulled 

Total ........ 

Canada 

United Kingdom : and 

Irish Free 

Norway . 
France '. 



Germany- 

Hungary' 

Yugoslavia 

Greece . . 

Bulgaria 

Rumania . 

Lithuania 

Latvia . . 

Estonia . 

Total 14 Nortl 
era Hemisphere 
countries 
Total 19 South- 
ern and North- 
ern Hemisphere 
countries 

Est. world produc- 
tion excl. 
Russia and 
Chi'.. Sj 

Russia 

China, exports . . . 



1,000 
pounds 



1,000 
pounds 



727,709 

'179,942 

332,321 

133,101 

■157,690 



833 
200 
319 
116 
235 



1,530,763 



1,704 



272,248 
41 , 400 



739 
205 
000 
000 
081 



1 ,.000 
pounds 

924,<*11 
202,386 
363,000 
129,000 
249,159 



: 1 , 000 
pounds 

'888,130 

•228,960 

'331,000 

131,000 

273,000 



1,000 
pounds 

950,000 
239,000 
343 , 000 
139,000 
283,000 



1,000 

pounds 

2/925,000 
3/255,000 
2/330,000 
2/150,000 
~ 302,000 



025 



1 , 867 , 956 



1,852,090 



1,954,000 



1,962,000 



245,562 
46,800 



260,976 
49,600 



281,914 
50,100 



303,715 
51 , 900 



308,947 
54.5C0 



313,648 



292 > 362 



310,576 



332,014 



355,615 



363,447 



13,188 



136,021 

5,150 

81,600 

43,893 

16,842 

35,500 

20,010 

29,100 

45,600 

3,690 

2,690 

1,409 



15^553 



109, 853 

. 5-, 940 

44,974 

50-, 160 

13:, 234 

2 8:, 6 43 

. 1&, 000 

25,400 

54,940 

4,660 

3,190 

2,235 



17,960 



1-14,567 

: 6,200 

46 , 517 

41 , 830 

13,170 

•28,783 

•14,500 

25,400 

•53 , 100 

5,030 

3, 11C 

2,065 



18,673 



116,537 

6,246 

3/ 50,180 

: 35,900 

: 11,760 

.28,004 

: 17,500 

20,050 

55,690 

3,770 

3,510 

2.062 



19,611 



119,690 

5,420 

3/ 49,840 

3/ 33,600 

11,500 

27,950 

16,625 

21,490 

53,060 

4,060 

3,270 

2,028 



21,234 



117,869 

5,640 

3/ 48.5P0 

3/ 31,900 

6.15C 

29,000 

17,790 

22,890 

3/ 52,480 

3 , 550 

3/ 2 , "CC 

3/ 1 , 460 



3/ 



748,341 



669,144 



682,80b 



703,896 



723,759 



724,890 



2,279,104 



2,373,169:2,550,764 



2,555,986 



2,677,759 



2,686,890 



2,762,000 



I 



2 , 903 ,000:3,089,000 



3,087,000 



3,208,000 



q/330,3U 
37,318 



315,000: 
56,817: 



351,000 
27,791 



369,000 
48 , 037 



385,000 
64,845 



397,000 



Includes wool shorn 
tne last few months 
See pages 25 and 26 



in the spring in the 
of the same calendar 
for source and notes, 



northern hemisphere and that shorn in 
year in the southern hemisphere. 



WOOL-23 - 25 - 

Estimated production in the grease, average 1909-1913, annual 
1935-1S2'. - Continued 

United States . - Fleece average 1909-1913, annual 1925-1929, pulled wool 
average '1909-1913, annual 1925-1929 official estimates of Sureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Canada - Average 1909-1913, estimated by assuming the average yield per 
sheep to be 7 pounds and per lamb 4 pounds as furnished by the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics for recent. years. As no separate statistics were given 
for sheep and lambs, tne percentage of lambs has been assumed to be the same 
as the average for the years 1920-1925, years 1925-1929 official estimates 
of the Dominion Eureau of Statistics. 

_ United Kingdom - Average 1909-1913, years 1925-1929, estimat.es are those 
of the Y rkshire Observer since more recent figures are available from it than 
from other sources. The figures of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries 
are as follows: Average 1909-1913, 126,000,000 pounds; 1923, 99.000,000 pound: 
1 924 , 1 03 , 000 , 000 pound s . 

Fr &"ce - Average 1909-1913, years 1925 and 1926 official estimates pub- 
lished in the Annuaire Statistique de la France 1926. Year 1927, 1928 and 
1929 see note 4/". 

Germany - Average 1909-1913, estimated on basis of numDer of sheep 
multiplied tiy average weight used by the Verein Deutscner wlollkaemmer und 
Karamgarn- Spinner. 1925-1927 Acting Commercial Attache Douglas Miller, Febru- 
ary 2, 1927, ■ 1928 and 1929 Assistant Trade Commissioner A. Douglas Cook, 
January 31, 1928, Feb. 1, 1929. 

Argentina - Average 1909-1913 estimates furnished by Consul Henry 
Hobertson quoted from "La Prensa" of August 18, 1919 - figures are based on 
exports and domestic consumption. Years 1925, 1926 and 1928 estimates of 
Buenos Aires Branch of First National Bank of Boston published in an intensive 
study entitled Wool Growing in Argentina, 'Estimate for 1927 based on exports, 
October-September, stocks and local consumption. Year 1929 see note 2/ . 

Uruguay - Average 1909-1913, annual exports years 1910-1914, Annuario de 
Estadistica Agricola. No estimates of stocks or domestic consumption avail- 
able. Year 1925 Commercial Attache L. B. Clark, January 3, 1927. Years 
1926 and 1927 Vice Consul Nathan Scarrett, October 19, 1928. 1928 Consul 
General C. Carrigan, June 14, 1929. For 1909 see note 2/. 

Australia - Average 1909-1913, official estimates calendar years 1909- 
1911, years ending June 30, 1913, 1914. Years 1925-1927 revised official 
estimates which are on the average about 5 per cent above the unrevised 
estimates. In these figures the discrepancies in the returns by land-hold- 
ers compared with those obtained by taking exports plus local consumption 
have Deen eliminated - Quarterly Summary Australian Statistics, Sept. 1929. 
Year 1929 International Institute of Agriculture. 

New Zealand - Average 1909-13, 1925 to 1928 estimates of Dalgety and 
Company. Year 1929 see note 4/. The official estimates as published in 
New Zealand are for sheep shorn on farms only and are as follows: 1923, 
16o,913,624 pounds; 1924, 183,030,545; 1925, 173,402,764; 1926, 165,497,864; 
1927, 194,887,524; 1928, 210,699,663. 

Continued - 



flOOL-23 - 26 - 

Estimated world production in the grepse, average 1909-1913, annual 

1925-1929 - Continued 

Union of South Africa - Average 1909-1913, exports October-September. 
Scoured wool changed to grease on basis of- 60 per cent shrinkage. 1925 to 
1929 Crop and Markets of the Union of South Africa, August 1929. 

Russia - Year 1916 Economic Life, December 13, 1928. Supplement 
published by the Government organization called the Workers Peasant Inspection, 
Years 1925 to 1929 - estimates from the publication of the State Planning 
Board entitled The Controlling Figures of the National Economy of the U.S.S.B. 
1929-30. 



1/ Average for years. 1909-1913 whenever available, otherwise for any year 
or years within or near this period for which estimates are available. 

2/ Estimate furnished by the International Institute of Agriculture. 

3/ Based on official estimate of sheep numbers at date nearest shearing 
time. 

4/ Estimates of the Yorkshire Observer. 

5/ Totals subject to revision. Few countries published official wool 
production figures. In the absence of official figures for most 
countries various estimates have been used. Some have been supplied 
by United States government representatives abroad, others are basei 
on sheep numbers at the date nearest shearing time. For some princi- 
pal exporting countries, exports alone, or exports, stocks and 
domestic consumption have been used as representing production. In 
the case of some Asiatic countries rough commercial estimates have 
been used while the figures of the United States Department of Commerce 
or tne National Association of wool manufacturers have been used for 
some other countries. 

6/ Year 1916. 



W00L-23 - 27 - 

Receipts, disposals, stocks in primary markets of the 
Southern-Hemisphere, 1329.-3(1 -season- 

Receipts of wool into store in Australia and Argentina from the 
beginning ox the season up to tne first of January show a falling 
off of about 9 per cent compared with the preceding season. Ship- 
ments for tne current season up to January 1 snow a reduction in 
Australia, New Zealand and Argentina compared with the same period 
of tne preceding season, while shipments for Uruguay and the Union 
cf South Africa were greater. 

Shipments from Australia for the first six months of the 1929-30 
season i.e. July to Decern oer', 1929 are estimated at 1,120,000 hales, 
a decrease of 10 per cent compared with the preceding season. The 
average weight per bale for the first five months cf this season is 
estimated at 310 pounds against 319 pounds for the same period last 
season. The decrease in exports from New Zealand for a similar 
period is estimated at 6 per cent, i. e. from 142,000 Dales to 133,000 
hales. Shipments from Argentina for the first three months of the 
season, i. e. October 1 to December 31 were approximately 42,000,000 
pounds against 59,000, 000' pounds a year ago, a decrease of almost 30 
per cent. Since the end of the year, there has ueen a dispute 
b 'tween exporters and consignees at Central Produce Market Buenos 
Aires which closed th<= market for a while, however it was reported on 
January 3 that it had opened again and that sales were talcing place 
with transactions very small. Exports of the current season's wool 
from the Union of South Africa up to Decemoer 24, 1929 aggregated 
approximately 152,000,000 pounds, grease and scoured wool, an increase 
of 17 per cent over official exports for the last half of 1928. Up to 
January, 1929 total sales are reported at about 200,000,000 pounds or 
two-thirds of the current clip. Of the remaining third of the clip 
to be disposed of about 50 to 60 per cent is short or lamb's wool. 
Shipments from Uruguay from October 1 to January 1 reached about 
16,000,000 pounds against 12,000,000 pounds last year, for the same 
period. 

It is estimated that the amount of wool in primary markets of 
the Southern Hemisphere for disposal 1/ during the first 6 or 9 months 
of 1930 according to the season in the different countries, is about 
6 per cent aoove last year. Stocks at selling centers in Australia 
on January 1 estimated at 390,000,000 pounds were 6 per cent above a 
year ago. In Argentina, stocks at Central Produce Market .Buenos Aires 
where about one-third of the total Argentina clip nas oeen disposed of 
during recent years 'were 4 per cent above a year ago. Stcks in the 
Union of South Africa were officially reported at 36,000,000 pounds on 
Decemoer 1, an increase of over 70 per cent of a year ago. 

]J This may include some wool in Argentina, Uruguay and New Zealand 
which has been sold but not yet snipped. 



W00L-23 



- 28 



Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1928-29 
clips with comparisons 



Country, item and period 



Quantity 



Australia: 
Receipts: 



1/ 



1929-30 clip 



1930 



Disposals: 



1930 



1930 



From July 1 to January 1, 

Same period 1929 

From July 1 to January 1 , 

Same period, 1929 

Stocks on hand, January 1 , 1930 

Same date, 1929 

Argentina: 

Receipts at Central Produce Market- 
July 1, 1929 to January 1, 1930 

Same period, 1929 

Shipments Octooer 1, 1929 to January 2, 

Same period, 1929 

Stocks at Central Produce Market- 
January 1 , 1930 

Same date, 1929 

Uruguay: 

Shipments: October 1, 1929 to January 1, 1930 

Same period, 1929 

Union of South Africa- 
Shipments: July 1, 1929 to December 2-i, 1929 

July 1 - Dec. 31, 1928 

December 1 , 1929 

December 1 , 1928 



Stocks: 



1,000 pounds 

2/ 697,500 
756,923 
307 , 520 
389,786 
389,980 
367,105 



49,218 
63,142 
41,812 
58,765 

19,857 
19,052 

15,937 
12,016 

152,000 

130,000 

36,398 

20,860 



Australia: 
Receipts: 

Disposals: 



1928-29 clip : 

1/ ■ 

From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 : zj 

Same period 1927-28 : 

From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 : 

Same period 1927-28 : 

Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 : 

Same date , 1928 : 

Argentina: : 

Receipts at Central Produce Market, .Buenos Aires- : 

Season July 1, 1928 to June 26, 1929 : 

Sane period 1927-28 : 

Shipments: October 1, 1928 to September 30, 1929 : 

Same period, 1927-28 : 

Stocks in Argentina : 

On September 30, 1929 : 

Same date, 192b : 

Urugury: : 

Receipts: Up to February 4, 1928 : 

: /. 6, 1929 : 

.rcn 1 , 1929 : i/ 

April 1, 1929 :4/ 

Shipments: October 1, 1928 to September 30, 1929 : 

Same pe ri od 1927-28 : 



834,051 
743 , 821 
820,317 
733,961 
13,734 
9,860 



99,646 
91 , 905 

317,186 

298, 

25,002 
18,520 

119, 

.641 
. . 
,530 
131, 



W00L-23 - 29 - 

Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1928-29 clips 
with comparisons - Cont'd 



Country, item and period . Quantity 

: 1,000 pounds 
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for disposal, small : 

April 11, 1929 : 15,872 

May 8, 1929 :4/ 10,912 

August 31, 1929 :4/ 8,928 

Union of South Africa: 

Exports: July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 : 283,000 

Same period 1927-28 : 273,000 

Stocks: Of unsold wool June 30, 1929 :5/o/ 9,149 

" " " June 30, 1928 :5/ 6,940 

New Zealand: : 

Shipments: July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 : 244,110 

Same period 1927-28 : 226 , 455 

Stocks: June 30, 1929 : 27,500 

June 30, 1928 : 18,800 



A ustralia: Season 1928-29 - Estimates of National Council of Wool 
Selling Brokers, Consul General Arthur Garrels, Melbourne, July 10, 1929. 
Weight per bale from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 14, 
and Dolgety's Annual Review, 1927-28, page 19. Season 1929-30 - Yorkshire 
Observer, January 11, 1930. Weight per bale, Country Life and Stock and 
Station Journal, December 20, 1929. Argentina:, Receipts, shipments, stocks 
at Central Produce Market, Review of River plate. Total stocks in Argen- 
tina, cable from Buenos Aires Branch First National Bank of Boston. 
Uruguay : Season 1928-29, receipts, Monthly Review, March, Bank of London 
and South America, Ltd., and Servicio Informativo para el Exterior, March 
and April 1929. Stocks, April 11, 1929 and May 8, 1929. Wool Record and 
Textile World, April 11, 1929, May 9, 1929 and October Review, Bank of 
London and South America, Ltd., shipments, Servicio Informativo para el 
Exterior, October 1, 1929. Season 1929-30 - Shipments - Review of the 
River Plate. Union of South Africa: Stocks, Monthly Bulletin of Union 
Statistics. Exports. Crops and Markets of Union of South Africa, August 
1929. 1929-30 - Commerce Reports December 9, 1929. Mew Zealand; Ship- 
ments - 1927-28 and 1928-29 Consul General W. L. Lowrie, Wellington, 
July 29. Stocks, Monthly Abstract of Statistics, August 26, 1929. 

1/ These figures concern only the clip of the season designated. 

2/ Have used average weight of bale for July-October, 1929 as 
estimated by the National Council of Wool Selling Brokers. No later esti- 
mate available as yet. 

3/ Converted to pounds by using estimate of average weight per bale 
or 310 pounds as furnished by the National Council of Wool Selling .brokers 
of Australia, July-June 1928-29, compared with an average of 304 pounds for 
period July 1 to June 30, 1927-28. 

4/ No corresponding estimates for preceding year available. 

5/ Scoured wool changed to grease on oasis of 60 per cent loss in 
scouring. 

6/ Practically all inferior sorts. 



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